Trade traffic with me using 2leep.com system

Mozquitoo: Top 10 World's Weirdest and Craziest Sports

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Top 10 World's Weirdest and Craziest Sports

Here’s the list:

10. Camel Wrestling

Camel wrestling (Turkish deve güreşi) is a sport in which two male Tülu camels wrestle, typically in response to a female camel in heat being led before them. It is most common in the Aegean region of Turkey, but is also been practiced in other parts of the Middle East and South Asia.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_nxUXiaBoAng/S4l2Cw2bXzI/AAAAAAAADdE/-OJdw9D8gU4/s400/Camel-Wrestling-6.jpg


9. Cheese Rolling

The Cooper's Hill Cheese-Rolling and Wake is an annual event held on the Spring Bank Holiday at Cooper's Hill, (grid reference SO892146) near Gloucester in the Cotswolds region of England.[1] It is traditionally by and for the people who live in the local village of Brockworth, but now people from all over the world take part. The event takes its name from the hill on which it occurs.

The event is traditional. In recent years, it has been managed in a quasi-official manner, but the events of 2010 and 2011 took place spontaneously without any management. Spectators were furious at the prospect of being charged a £20 entry fee.[2]

http://www.genx40.com/images/2006b/_41700740_cheese416afp.jpg


8. Wife Carrying

Wife carrying (Estonian: naisekandmine , Finnish: eukonkanto or akankanto, Swedish: kärringkånk) is a sport in which male competitors race while each carrying a female teammate. The objective is for the male to carry the female through a special obstacle track in the fastest time. The sport was first introduced at Sonkajärvi, Finland.

Several types of carry may be practised: piggyback, fireman's carry (over the shoulder), or Estonian-style (the wife hangs upside-down with her legs around the husband's shoulders, holding onto his waist).

http://www.mainetoday.com/enternews/photos/NL_Oct10_WifeCarrying_9918.jpg


7. Chess Boxing

Chessboxing is a hybrid sport that combines chess with boxing in alternating rounds. Most of the world championships have been held in Berlin. Ten events organised by the World Chess Boxing Organisation have been held in Germany overall. In London, England there have been 10 international chessboxing tournaments since 2008. Several other chessboxing events have taken place around the world, including in Los Angeles, Nantes (France), Reykjavík (Iceland), Amsterdam and Krasnoyarsk (Siberia) although Berlin and London in particular have emerged as the most important centres for chessboxing. The sport was invented by Dutch artist Iepe Rubingh, who was inspired by a French comic book 'Le Froid Equateur' by artist and filmmaker Enki Bilal. Chess boxing is now growing in popularity.[1] Participants must be skilled as both boxers and chess players, as a match may be won either way.

http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2008/0807/a_lchess_0721_a.jpg


6. Tow-In Surfing

Tow-in surfing is a surfing technique which uses artificial assistance to allow the surfer to catch faster moving waves than was traditionally possible when paddling by hand.

http://fastcache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2009/08/Laird_Hamilton_Paddle_Surf.jpg


5. Cyclocross

Cyclo-cross (sometimes cyclocross, CX, CCX, cyclo-X or 'cross') is a form of bicycle racing. Races typically take place in the autumn and winter (the international or "World Cup" season is September–January), and consists of many laps of a short (2.5–3.5 km or 1.5–2 mile) course featuring pavement, wooded trails, grass, steep hills and obstacles requiring the rider to quickly dismount, carry the bike whilst navigating the obstruction and remount.[1][2] Races for senior categories are generally between 30 minutes and an hour long, with the distance varying depending on the ground conditions. The sport is strongest in the traditional road cycling countries such as Belgium (and Flanders in particular), France and the Netherlands.


4. Bog Snorkeling

Bog snorkelling is a sporting event that consists of competitors completing two consecutive lengths of a 60-yard (55 m) water filled trench cut through a peat bog, in the shortest time possible. Competitors must wear snorkels and flippers, and complete the course without using conventional swimming strokes, relying on flipper power alone. Wet suits are not compulsory, but are usually worn.

http://www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00049/bog_49479s.jpg


3. Free Solo

Free solo climbing, also known as free soloing, is a form of free climbing where the climber (the free soloist) forgoes ropes, harnesses and other protective gear while ascending and relies only on his or her physical strength, climbing ability, and psychological fortitude to avoid a fatal fall. Free solo climbing should not be confused with general free climbing, in which gear is typically used for safety in case of a fall, but not to assist the climb.

http://www.climbing.com/news/hotflashes/Geo3.jpg


2. 4WD Sand Dune Climbing

Long ride through the sand dune

http://oddstufflab.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/4WD-Sand-Dune-Climbing.jpg


1. Ladder Racing

Ever since the beginning of the fire service, when ladders, hoses - and even buckets - were invented as a way to extinguish fires, there was always a spirit of competition among firefighters as to who could be the first to extinguish the fire. In these early days, a monetary reward was paid to those who were able to extinguish a fire. Out of this spirit of competition grew a unique form of racing team, which although can be found in a few different areas across the United States, has its roots with and is most widely practiced in the Long Island region of New York State.

http://owegopennysaver.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Hose-Race2.jpg

source: http://en.wikipedia.org

No comments:

Post a Comment

BlogCatalog Craft Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory